Workday Reading

The Daily Eight: September 21, 2016

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There will be two posts today.  They’re just in reverse; look for the second at 3pm EST.

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1) Amal Clooney is bringing a lawsuit against ISIS. (Vanity Fair)

2) These Nine West Raheza cut-out heels take basic work pumps to a new level in tan, black, or wine.

3) Fears of a college-educated barista, why things are better for STEM grads than liberal arts grads. (The Atlantic)

4) Last Call is having a friends and family sale.  I grabbed these wide leg Lafayette 148 trousers and this Reece 3/4 sleeve sheath dress in fig ($69!).

5) Networking tips for before, during, and after a conference. (Hitha on the Go)

6) Factory restocked the Clare Cardi in my favorite color (bright plum), and the Teddy Crewneck in the best burgundy.

7) What happened when a manufacturer moved his employees to a 5-hour workday. (Fast Company)

8) Nordstrom has stocked a waterproof over the knee suede boot.  Commuting will never be the same.

*image found here.

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

    19 comments

  1. Alexandria Knox says:

    I love all the shoes you post Belle. It stinks being an intern on a tight budget though, well I love the interning part just not the budget hahaha. Where can I find good professional shoes on an intern budget?

    September 21, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Depends on what you consider an intern budget. I would be looking for coupon codes for Sole Society or Nine West. I’d also look at ASOS.

      September 21, 2016/Reply
  2. Jenn S. says:

    I’m not on an intern budget, but my heels are. Of all places, Payless has a pair of basic, decent pumps. https://www.payless.com/womens-karmen-pump/70962.html?dwvar_70962 They’re on sale for $16 today and they come in a variety of colors.

    I discovered them four years ago and bought my third set of pairs (I buy them in black and nude) today to take advantage of the sale. They aren’t exactly fashion-forward, but they aren’t frumpy, and they’re reasonably comfortable. I’m satisfied with their wear considering the hilariously low price-point; even at full price they’re a good deal, but Payless is one of those stores you never *have* to pay full price at.

    September 21, 2016/Reply
  3. Cait says:

    As a recent grad with a humanities degree, I appreciated the Atlantic piece but wish it had gone more in-depth about why the growth in jobs in humanities fields has stagnated. I’m obviously biased, but I believe that there are many humanities programs that teach valuable skills, but that somehow job markets don’t match college majors. In my experience, students in the humanities are more likely to be told that they have little or no chance for employment unless they get a Master’s degree or beyond, while students in STEM fields are more likely to be pushed towards immediate employment in their field after their bachelor’s degree. Why is there such a disconnect between higher education and the job market in the humanities?

    September 21, 2016/Reply
    • LS says:

      I am a STEM major and based on myself and my colleagues, I actually use a significant portion of what I learned in undergrad in my job. That’s become slightly less true recently since Tech moves so quickly, but for the first few years, my degree was really relevant.

      As an outsider, humanities majors appear to learn broadly applicable, foundational skills that usually don’t translate directly to a real-world job (exceptions for careers like journalism etc). To me, the push to advanced degrees makes sense because that’s where you narrow your focus and learn more specific skills.

      Agree? Disagree?

      September 21, 2016/Reply
      • Anna says:

        @LS I disagree to an extent. In many cases, advanced degrees in humanities aren’t really necessary for the jobs grads seek and end up leaving people further in debt without significant increases in income. You’re right that the humanities teach foundational skills, but they’re skills that can be applied to a variety of real-world jobs and that can be easily transferable, both of which are assets in a rapidly changing economy. The issue is, few humanities majors can walk out of undergrad right into a job. They need to have had some work experience in college, whether at the intern or low level in order to be employable in humanities fields.

        September 21, 2016/Reply
        • LS says:

          Good points. Why do you think they need to have prior jobs? Just due to supply?

          September 21, 2016/Reply
          • Anna says:

            Partly, but also because the degree on its own doesn’t prove you can do the job since the degree isn’t job specific and because jobs in the humanities also tend to be more dependent on interpersonal skills that aren’t taught in a classroom. My brother, a UX designer, for example was hired straight out of undergrad without ever having a 9-5 job, but in a lot of his classes his projects were the kinds of work he would be expected to do once he graduated. I work in politics and I can spout off all the political theory I want, it isn’t going to help me get a bill passed or a candidate elected. Maybe some humanities degrees can incorporate more real-world skills, but some things also just can’t be taught in a classroom.

            September 21, 2016/Reply
          • LS says:

            It sounds like we’re saying the same thing here. My degree (like your brothers) is immediately applicable to a job, but humanities fields aren’t like that. If humanities jobs need real-world skills that can’t be taught in a classroom, what are people supposed to do? It sounds like they need a job to learn those skills, but they can’t get hired because they don’t have any previous experience. It’s a cycle and I think it’s based mostly on supply. Employers don’t need to take a chance on untested humanities talent because there are so many people to chose from.

            September 22, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I think it leads back to an older way of thinking. In the early to mid 1900s, we taught people art history and literature and then they went into business and finance and were still considered educated in a renaissance-man kind of way. Their bosses trained them to do the job in front of them. Now, people want more job-related training and more specialized knowledge before someone starts. I tell all the HS age kids I know to go to college and study a job-related field (computer science, business, etc.) and then study their passion (poli-sci, journalism, etc.) as a minor.

      September 21, 2016/Reply
      • Anna says:

        Maybe it’s the staffer in me, but I always tell kids your degree doesn’t matter, it’s whom you know and what experience you’ve had. I think in a lot of cases having a very specific degree can be a hindrance if you can’t find a job in that field, or technology changes and your skills aren’t as valuable anymore.

        September 21, 2016/Reply
  4. Kelly says:

    I have had the Blondo Eden boots for two winters and can’t wait to pull them out for a third. The price tag is worth it to me – they are already weatherproofed (like Aquatalia) and hold up beautifully. They have held their shape and the suede is in like-new condition after two winters in the elements. Seeing them on sale makes me want to scoop up a second pair!

    September 21, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Good to know, thanks.

      September 21, 2016/Reply
  5. Kk says:

    Here’s how I know I’m an auditory learner- I read the post, got all excited to click over for a $69 Reiss dress- sadly to see its Tahari ASL. Still cute- but not exactly the deal I’d expected!

    September 21, 2016/Reply
  6. Michaela says:

    Are the J Crew Factory sweaters like the Teddy appropriate quality for the price? Do you prefer them to other brands you’ve linked like LL Bean? I’m hoping to get some crewneck basics but want a good quality for $50-$100 (or less).

    September 21, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      The LL Bean is a bit better quality, but a bit matronly. I think the Jcrew, with a coupon code, are well priced.

      September 21, 2016/Reply
    • K says:

      I tried Halogen and was really satisfied. They don’t last forever, but they’re SO easy to replace. I’ll be ordering more. I’ve tried the Lands End cardigans and the fabric survives the dryer like nothing else. The cut is not great–really generous and really boxy. I will probably not be ordering more.

      September 21, 2016/Reply
  7. Michaela says:

    Thank you!

    September 22, 2016/Reply