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BPGP: Raw Honey Face Mask

1jgsjfsjfA few weeks ago, I was scrolling through my Instagram when I saw a photo from E at District of Chic touting the benefits of a “raw honey mask.”  I’d never heard of such a thing, but I was immediately curious.

Since the Egyptians, and probably before, honey’s anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties have been used to treat skin problems.  Some health and beauty blogs believe that raw honey can be used to treat everything from acne to rosacea to eczema by gently cleansing and treating the skin while maintaining a health pH balance.

The most prevalent use raw honey masks is to treat acne.  You can apply raw honey as a spot treatment if you feel a blemish development.  You can also mix it with cinnamon to create a potent bacteria-killing mask.  I was amazed how bright my skin looked after I applied a honey mask.  My skin was much less red, and a few small blemishes around my nose shrunk considerably after the mask.

Don’t have acne?  (Lucky you.)  You can also use raw honey to treat dry skin, dark marks or to exfoliate and decongest sensitive skin.  I also found this post that discusses cleansing your face with raw honey.  Which, given the dry conditions, might be kinder to skin than soap.

So where to buy raw honey, I picked up a jar at Trader Joe’s, but you can order it from Amazon as well.  Most varieties clearly mark that they are raw honey, but you can see the difference because raw honey is cloudy and waxy, not clear and viscous like filtered honey.

I’m always glad to find a natural alternative to a beauty product that costs me a lot of money.  I’ve alternated my Origins charcoal mask with a raw honey mask, and after four weeks, my skin has never looked better.  Of course, the honey’s not entirely responsible, but I think it’s helping.

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    12 comments

  1. Sav says:

    Belle, how often do you use your Origins mask? I’ve purchased it per your recommendation and love it, but wasn’t sure how often it (or the honey mask) should be used for optimal results. Thank you!

    October 24, 2013/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I’ve been using it once a week, sometimes twice if necessary. But it says on the package not to get excessive with it.

      October 24, 2013/Reply
  2. AB says:

    Belle, have you tried Makeup Artist’s Choice 25% mandelic peel and/or mandelic toner? CHANGED my acne-riddled, combo skin. It is the best thing I have ever, ever used. The packaging isn’t fancy but it’s the best. Check our reviews on MUA

    October 24, 2013/Reply
  3. ohraq says:

    I’m a little confused by the mask… how hard is it to get the honey off your face?

    October 24, 2013/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Not very. I put just a little soap in my hand, and it came right off.

      October 24, 2013/Reply
  4. MCD says:

    Can you share the link to District of Chic’s mention/experience? Yes, I can look it up but it would be nice for everyone to quickly click over. And, for her to know where her traffic is coming from.

    October 24, 2013/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I meant to do that initially but forgot. I added the link, but it wasn’t a post, just an instagram photo.

      October 24, 2013/Reply
  5. Mary says:

    Raw honey isn’t always cloudy, so don’t be skeptical if it says “raw” but doesn’t look different than filtered honey. It will usually crystallize faster though, but if you put it in a bowl of hot water, it will go back to normal. Don’t directly heat it because that kills some of the good stuff. It won’t hurt it, but it won’t have as many beneficial properties. I get mine from my good friends who are beekeepers. Honey will rinse off with just warm water. It makes a good moisturizer, too. Put a drop on your finger tips, wet your fingers, and rub it in. Make sure you wet your fingers first or it will be sticky.

    October 24, 2013/Reply
  6. save. spend. splurge. says:

    Honey is also really moisturizing as it’s a natural humectant.

    October 25, 2013/Reply
  7. Trista says:

    Belle, you may want to consider finding a local apiary and purchasing honey from a local beekeeper. Local honey has the added benefit of local pollen, so if you use it over time your body becomes desensitized to any probable allergens. Allergies are a huge issue for me, and having local honey in a cup of tea at least a couple times per week helps over time. I found this group of beekeepers in DC, and you may be able to email them to find a local seller: https://www.dcbeekeepers.org/

    October 26, 2013/Reply
    • Belle says:

      My old co-worker has an apiary, but she only sells it filtered. But maybe I can find someone who sells it raw.

      October 26, 2013/Reply
  8. districtofchic says:

    Glad you liked it! I’ve noticed a significant reduction in redness (which my face is prone to) since I started using it 2-3x a week!

    October 30, 2013/Reply