Workday Reading

The Daily Eight: August 17, 2016

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1) The real reasons your friends are sick of you complaining about your job. (The Muse)

2) Need a weekender/gym bag that kills it?  This Kate Spade Lyla weekender in leopard nylon is so, so very cool.

3) Working while pregnant, why some bosses still think it’s a big problem. (The Washington Post)

4) rms Beauty Uncover Up is one of the very best concealers on the market.  And when you apply it with their Skin2Skin foundation brush, your acne scars and hyper-pigmentation basically vanish.

5) Ask a Boss: I’m expected to work extra because I don’t have kids! (The Cut)

6) This Vince Camuto draped, faux wrap top must be mine.  It’s the perfect not-so-basic blouse.

7) The working conditions for Amazon’s blue collar labor force have me rethinking my Prime subscription. (The Grist)

8) Um, this Barefoot Dreams Travel Shawl looks too cozy to be allowed.  Not sure I would wear it in public, but on a sick day on my couch, definitely.

*image found here.

LEAVE A COMMENT

    15 comments

  1. L says:

    As someone, who at 42 orders in 2016, is slated to outpace her 2015 high of 62 amazon.com orders, that article is making me think I should cancel my prime membership and find other vendors or (gasp) go to the store. However, I wonder how the workers (blue- and white-collar) at other alternate retailers like soap.com are treated? Are those conditions (regrettably) standard? Will cancelling my amazon prime membership be a phantom feel-good statement? Does anyone have insight?

    August 17, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      That’s true, maybe there’s a way to find out. Maybe a Change.org petition or something? It seems crazy for Amazon to be subjecting workers to these conditions.

      August 17, 2016/Reply
    • LS says:

      Not trying to get on a soapbox here, but I thought everyone knew this, but just didn’t care. There were a bunch of stories circulating about Amazon warehouse conditions a few years ago. The link below is the one that made me stop buying from Amazon altogether. The journalist herself went undercover. Her story is terrifying.

      https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/02/mac-mcclelland-free-online-shipping-warehouses-labor

      August 18, 2016/Reply
    • Allison says:

      Having toured many warehouses for work, I can say that Amazon’s are by far some of the best I’ve seen. They install HVAC systems in all their new warehouses which is very expensive and not standard. Air conditioning is rare in warehouses given the ceiling heights; most warehouses are cooled using large ceiling fans if at all. If the is an alternative retailer out there with better facilities I’m not aware them.

      August 20, 2016/Reply
  2. LGR says:

    Went all in on rms this summer and have been loving it. Do you really notice that much of a difference in application with the brush? I’ve been using my fingers and I’m pretty obsessed as is.

    August 17, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Very smooth, airbrushed almost.

      August 17, 2016/Reply
  3. E says:

    I second L’s comment. I don’t LIKE the idea of supporting terrible working conditions but I also don’t have the time to drive around to the three different stores Amazon saved me from having to make trips to this week and/or paying twice as much when I order through other sites and have to pay shipping.

    In a similar vein I’d love to hear what others know about responsible/sustainable fashion. I also don’t want to support sweatshop labor and questionable farming practices – but the reality is that a recent search for sustainable/fair trade/made in the USA pajamas (several recent searches) yielded roughly 6-8 brands that made the kind of PJs I want (old school button down shirts with the lounge pants) ALL of which were priced around $150 a set. Now I know that paying more for labor = the consumer paying more, but I don’t have $150 to spend on PJs! (Note: Everlane had a cute PJ set, priced relatively reasonably… but in hand wash only silk – ain’t nobody (with a toddler) got time to wear and hand wash silk PJs!)

    I’ve resigned myself to shopping where I can afford, buying the best quality I can, and only buying what I actually NEED – but I’d love to have a list of sources of responsible fashion choices for those of us on more modest budgets.

    August 17, 2016/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Buying American made is really difficult. I just bought some Room & Board couches, and they’re great, but the price difference was not encouraging.

      August 17, 2016/Reply
      • Monica says:

        I have also tried those searches, and am usually disappointed. Either the products are out of my price range, or they are in limited sizes or the wrong fit for my body type (a lot of Everlane stuff falls here). I have resigned myself to shopping less overall, and shopping second hand whenever possible. Not only is well-designed, USA made stuff more affordable when someone wore it once (lucky me!) but it’s contributing to less overall waste at all stages of the supply chain. I have wonderful luck on ThredUp, which Belle turned me on to a few years ago, and find Paige Denim, Theory, Rag and Bone stuff for a fraction of the price.

        August 17, 2016/Reply
      • LS says:

        I wanted to offer some general advice after a few years experience into the ethical fashion journey:
        1. Google sucks for searching! Find a few bloggers that focus on ethical fashion and a few brands that you like. They will lead you to other brands and other bloggers you’ve never heard of. The more you get into the ethical fashion world, the more you realize how many options there are.
        2. Do not be discouraged if your size is not currently available. Small companies are always going to start with the middle sizes. If you vocalize your desire for ethically made clothing in your size, they will listen. That’s the benefit of “small”. Some examples: Haley from Only Child is releasing her fall line in sizes after doing a few collections one-size only. Elizabeth Suzann has added “short” and “tall” options for pants.
        3. You will not be able to buy the same quantity of clothing with the same frequency if you buy ethical. It’s just not possible. Get over it now. You will have better quality clothing that lasts infinitely longer.

        Also, I want to point out is that USA made is not necessarily better (see the Amazon example). You can buy things from overseas that are not made by children in sweatshops. In a number of Southeast Asian countries, textiles are an important part of the economy. If everyone starting buying USA-only, there would be a severe impact.

        August 18, 2016/Reply
        • E says:

          Great tips! Thank you!

          Yes, to clarify I didn’t intent to imply I was only looking for US made. I just used it as a shorthand when my searches for ethical/sustainable/fair trade fashion yielded few results.

          Are there ethical fashion bloggers you would suggest?

          And yes, I need to use ThreadUp as a resource for buying – I’ve sold stuff on there a few times but haven’t yet bought. Thank you for the nudge in the right direction!

          And Belle – thanks for the great blog! Love the real work world outfit ideas and the community here is obviously great! 😉

          August 18, 2016/Reply
          • LS says:

            My favorite blogger for ethical style is Lee from Style Bee. I’ve found so many brands through her. Andrea from Seasons + Salt is also awesome. Her style isn’t for me personally but her voice and the community on her blog is great. Temporary Housewifey is exclusively reviews, but of brands in the generally ethical world like Everlane, Cuyana, Grana, etc.

            August 23, 2016/Reply
          • LS says:

            Oh also, if you haven’t seen The True Cost documentary, please do so! See the actual conditions, hearing about Rana Plaza really drove it home fo rme.

            August 23, 2016/Reply
    • Got It At Goodwill says:

      Secondhand shopping is a great way to get all the style and brands you want without supporting unethical labor practices. Definitely look at ThredUp and Poshmark for online shopping. I buy almost all of my clothes at thrift stores and wear brands like J.Crew, Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, etc.

      August 17, 2016/Reply
      • Belle says:

        But aren’t you still promoting the brands, albeit secondhand? If those brands sell well in consignment, they’ll continue to sell well in the first market.

        August 17, 2016/Reply