Workday Reading

The Workday Reading: March 5, 2015

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1) It is now child neglect in the state of Maryland to let your 10-year-old and 6-year-old children walk home from the park alone.  If we don’t teach children independence, how do we expect them to be productive adults?  Or do we expect parents to keep helicopter-parenting well into the college years? (Washington Post has an interesting follow up.)

2) This lace-sleeved sheath dress from Rebecca Taylor miraculously makes lace modern and cool.  So awesome.

3) They’re remaking Jem and The Holograms.  Why does Hollywood insist on ruining my “truly outrageous” childhood memories?

4) I adore the charming container that this cherry lip balm comes in.  But if the winter weather has your lips feeling the burn, you need Jack Back Intense Therapy lip balm in Grapefruit & Ginger.  (The Black Tea and Blackberry is also lovely.)

5) 21 Times Tumblr Proved that English is the Worst Language.

6) This white Cameo cocktail dress is a sculptural dream.  It would look amazing with these black, beaded tassel earrings.

*image found here.

Have a suggestion for the workday reading? E-mail it to capitolhillstyle@gmail.com or tweet it to @caphillstyle.

LEAVE A COMMENT

    22 comments

  1. N says:

    I grew up in a dangerous neighborhood, and my parents never let me walk home from school (or anywhere) alone as a child–and rightfully so. I have since gone on to do very well for myself, and am independent and responsible. In my case, my parents were not “babying” me, but instead taught me about the importance of safety and how to make responsible decisions. I can’t speak for others’ situations, but I will say that I still turned out independent and “productive” despite always going home with a guardian after school.

    March 5, 2015/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I guess the difference is the dangerous neighborhood. That, to me, is incredibly reasonable and necessary to keep you protected. But when I hear people in the suburbs helicoptering their children and telling them they’re never safe, I think that’s a great way to foster paranoia and make it so kids have trouble being independent.

      March 5, 2015/Reply
      • TT says:

        They weren’t in the suburbs. They were off Georgia Ave in MD (so silver spring or just north or that). Definitely not the safest place for kids to walk alone.

        March 5, 2015/Reply
        • Belle says:

          I wasn’t referring to this specific case, but suburbanites in general. I think there’s this growing paranoia that we’re passing onto children that they’re always in danger, and I don’t think it’s healthy. And with crime rates at historical lows, I don’t think it’s based in reality. I’m not familiar with this specific area in Silver Spring, so maybe it is more dangerous than it was made out to be, but I’m still concerned about the issue generally.

          March 6, 2015/Reply
          • TT says:

            This instance has been in the Washington post several times – Georgia Ave is a 4-5 lane road with significant traffic pretty much at all times of the day/night. I would not be worried about a kid getting snatched, but I would worry about them getting hit by a car there because of the traffic and the many in attentive drivers in DC/MD.

            Helicopter parenting is a bit annoying, I agree, but I find it much more annoying in a school setting when parents argue over their child’s grades or behavior issues.

            March 6, 2015/Reply
      • Andrea says:

        Are you delusional that bad things don’t happen in the suburbs?

        March 6, 2015/Reply
  2. Monica says:

    There are many things a 10 year old should be protected from, but I don’t think walking home from the park is one of them. How can a society that so ruthlessly pushes violence, sex and materialism on our children draw a line in the sand over independence? I would hope a parent knows if their neighborhood is safe enough for this behavior, at least better than a state official does.

    My daughter is years away from this even being an issue (i think under 2 is a little young for free-ranging). But it’s hard to deny that even if there is a 1% chance of something bad happening, I’d do anything to keep that 1% from being my daughter. It’s a slippery slope.

    March 5, 2015/Reply
  3. A says:

    Belle, may I ask why this series is titled Workday Reading? The last several entries have contained significantly more affiliate shopping links than articles or other reading material. Perhaps this is not your intent, but it strikes me as a bit disingenuous, and I wonder if there is a more apt title that could be used.

    March 5, 2015/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Because it’s posted at the end of the workday, not because it’s all about work. Maybe there is a better titled, I considered “daily reading” but this was the one I had used before. It’s tough to find enough articles just about work and professionalism that aren’t repetitive.

      And while there are a affiliate links, they’re links to things I want to show and think are awesome, they’re not just there for no reason.

      March 5, 2015/Reply
      • A says:

        My concern was about the “reading” portion of the title, not the “workday” aspect. When all of the recent posts contain over 60% affiliate links, it just doesn’t really strike me as appropriate to label them as reading. Anyway, just my two cents. I’ve been reading your blog for quite some time but lately the amount of affiliate links has grown tiresome, especially when there is no accompanying picture which effectively forces the reader to click a link just in order to see what you’re talking about.

        March 5, 2015/Reply
        • Erin W says:

          I love the reading posts. Maybe the links are click-bait, but I find a lot of good things (too many for my husband’s liking). I don’t expect you to write for free, but on some of the other posts, a few more pictures would be nice.

          March 5, 2015/Reply
        • Sarah says:

          Belle, your blog is one of the only ones I visit every day because you consistently post great content. When you have a solid product, you have every right to monetize it. It’s hardly an extraordinary inconvenience for us to click links. Keep up the great work – I love that you’re doing the Workday Reading daily now!

          March 5, 2015/Reply
      • Also Sarah says:

        I also like photos, but these posts don’t bother me. I’ve definitely found some interesting things, but girl…law school is expensive. We get it. Well, many of us do.

        March 6, 2015/Reply
  4. TT says:

    As for the “free range” kids – they were on Georgia Ave just north of DC. While kidnapping or violent crimes are rare, that wouldn’t be my primary concern – the traffic would be. I have a 6year old, and there’s no way he’s walking home an entire mile on Georgia Ave! (We live off Georgia – the traffic is horrible and he and I have almost been many times – he’s not capable of dodging that on his own and I’m not really sure a 10year old is either)

    March 5, 2015/Reply
    • S says:

      How about you worry about your kid instead of worrying about kids that aren’t yours?

      March 6, 2015/Reply
      • LB says:

        aren’t you rude.

        March 6, 2015/Reply
  5. Andrea says:

    Seriously? Helicopter parenting? Do you have kids? As a parent of 3 kids, I would not let my kids walk home from school alone. The world isn’t the way it used to be 30 years ago when I was 10. Doesn’t mean that parents who are protective and watchful of the safety of their kids, are going to be living with them in their college dorm well into their adult years. Please stick to fashion rather than making judgment calls about parenting. Once you are a parent, let’s talk.

    March 6, 2015/Reply
    • KC says:

      Actually, the world is not more dangerous than when we were growing up. And, I have to deal with young adults who lack independence in professional settings, so I find the topic relevant and am interested in other professionals’ experiences and takes on the situation. You can justify your parenting however you want, and you are free to parent however you want, but you cannot change the workplace’s attitude toward your final product. Maybe your kids will be safer while they are growing up, but if they can’t come talk to me about issues at work and can’t plan and prepare for an out-of-town hearing, they’re not going to last at my office. Maybe yours will turn out better, fingers crossed.

      March 6, 2015/Reply
    • L says:

      Mommy knows best (in case the internet doesn’t remind us of that 10 times a day). That said, the world isn’t the way it was 30 years ago. It’s safer. Some statistics show violent crime is down as much at 50%. So perhaps instead of insulting Belle, you should do a little research. The internet is almost as replete with stories about the declining crime rate as it is with judgmental mommies. https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/2012/0109/US-crime-rate-at-lowest-point-in-decades.-Why-America-is-safer-now

      March 6, 2015/Reply
    • Belle says:

      To say that anyone who isn’t a parent can’t have an opinion about how a public, taxpayer funded agency conducts its business is short sighted. Also, as an intern coordinator, a student mentor, and a volunteer at two schools in my community, I deal or have dealt with young people and parents every day for years. Imagine having the parents of a 21yr old intern call to ask you if their child is coming into work? Or having the mother of a 16 yr old debater email you about her daughters personal life? I think most parents do an awesome job at something that is unbelievably difficult, but there is a lot of research and news coverage about how parents are doing more for heir kids now than they did in repvious generations and that its damaging their critical thinking skills and ability to rely on themselves. Also while I think we’re more aware of existing threats to our children now than we were when we were kids, I believe the news coverage and fictional television programs creates a socially accepted belief that everyone is in danger, and I don’t think its correct or good for our society.

      March 6, 2015/Reply